Glossary

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Contract: this is the set of terms binding the purchasing entity to the contract catering firm in the context of the provision of services. The contract refers to a public invitation to tender, or to the relationship between the client (the entity) and the service provider (the contract catering company).

Tendering procedure: competition between various providers to perform a contract. The concept of invitation to tender refers specifically to the awarding of a contract in the public or private sector. Invitations to tender are by nature more regulated in the public than in the private sector, with legal deadlines for advertising (the announcement of the tender and the announcement of the award).

Announcement of the tender: in the context of tendering procedures by a public authority, the launching of the tendering procedure must be announced and advertised according to legal requirements.

Award announcement: in the context of tendering procedures by a public authority, the results of the procedure (winning tenderer, amount of the contract) must be announced and advertised according to legal requirements.

Award entity, conceding entity or purchaser: the entity (public authority or private company) that is organising the tendering procedure. In other words, the body purchasing the catering service.

CCC: Contract Catering Company.

Service provider: in this guide, this is the Contract Catering Company.

Tenderer: the undertaking applying as a candidate to take part in the tendering procedure organised by the entity.

Successful tenderer: the undertaking to which the contract is awarded.

User: “final customer”, the consumer living in and/or working for the entity.

Provision of multi-services: provision of various services, for instance catering and cleaning, by the same service provider.

HACCP: Hazard Analysis Control Critical Point (set of principles to analyse risks and control critical points).

Excl. Taxes: Taxes not included.

Variants: replies and proposals by tenderers that go beyond the minimum requirements set down in the specifications. Generally speaking, tenderers must formulate a basic offer that strictly complies with the specifications. They may, if the entities in the invitation to tender mention this, propose alternative or innovative solutions that go beyond the “basic offer”.

Content of this guide

With the financial support of the EU
Grant Agreement
VS/2004/0655 SI2.39852